April 26, 2 Chronicles 21-25

 

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Again, we see in today’s reading some lessons we already have encountered. With Jehoram in chapter 21, we see that we reap what we sow.  (Go back and read the summary of Jehoram’s life in 21:20.  Ouch!  That is not a good epitaph.)  This is a lesson from Genesis to Revelation.  Why do we have such a hard time learning the lesson that has been proven over and over again? From Joash in chapter 24, we learn again the tragedy of not finishing well. From Amaziah in chapter 25, we learn the tragedy of not following the LORD wholeheartedly.

In many respects, the chapters we have read today serve as a microcosm of the entire history of Israel and Judah.  There were times when they obeyed the LORD and they reaped the benefits.  However, far too often, Israel disobeyed and reaped the consequences of their disobedience.

Devotional by Steve Horn. Scripture links by www.biblegateway.com. Animated video by www.thebibleproject.com

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April 25, 2 Chronicles 17-20

 

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We have learned that sometimes we learn from positive examples while at other times we learn from negative examples.  Today, we learn from one man, King Jehoshaphat, both a positive and a negative example.  We first learn a positive example in chapter 17.  King Jehoshaphat dispatched teachers of the Book of the Law to all the towns of Judah.  This practice served the kingdom well.  I often think how we spend our time writing letters, having rallies, and calling lawmakers, but to little avail.  I try to remind myself often that nothing is going to create change in our society like the kind of change created when people are changed by the Word of God.

The good lesson example of Jehoshaphat continues in chapter 18 as he seeks the counsel of the LORD as to whether to go to war.  Unfortunately, this is where we begin to learn from the bad example set by Jehoshaphat.  Instead of completely trusting in God, he begins to make alliances with the wicked kings of Israel.

There is yet another positive lesson to learn from Jehoshaphat, though.  The prayer that he prays as recorded in chapter 20 is one of my favorite.  Here is the real essence of what it means to pray.  Notice especially verse 12.  “We do not know what to do, but our eyes are upon you.”

Think about some overwhelming circumstance in your life today and make this your prayer.

Devotional by Steve Horn. Scripture links by www.biblegateway.com. Animated video by www.thebibleproject.com

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April 24, 2 Chronicles 13-16

 

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If I had one message left to preach, that message would be on the cross and the resurrection.  If I had two messages left to preach, the other message would be from our reading today.  I have often thought about King Asa as an example of so many Christians.  Asa served the LORD in one season in his life, but was not serving the LORD as his life came to a close.  In chapter 14, we read that King Asa removed the pagan altars.  He relied on the LORD for success in military battles.  In chapter 15, we read that Asa was a person who gained the respect of others and influenced them to a point of serving God.  However, all of that changes in chapter 16.  Asa ceased to rely on God, and instead, relied on another king.  When confronted with his sin, Asa was so enraged that he put his “confronter” in prison.  Then, in a very sad commentary, we read that Asa died seeking help only from the physicians, but not from the LORD.

How does this backwards transformation happen?  I think we have our clue in 2 Chronicles 16:9.  Whatever good may be said about Asa, it must have been that his heart was not fully committed to God.

As you think about Asa’s story, allow me to leave you two thoughts to ponder.  First, understand, that your relationship with God today says nothing about your relationship with God tomorrow.  That is, you must strive to be fully committed to God every day.  If not, you may slowly drift in your relationship to Him.  Second, ask yourself today if there is anything in your life that gives evidence of not being fully committed to God.

Devotional by Steve Horn. Scripture links by www.biblegateway.com. Animated video by www.thebibleproject.com

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April 23, 2 Chronicles 10-12

 

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Have you noticed how the kings mentioned throughout our readings are memorialized as either doing evil in the sight of the LORD or doing right in the sight of the LORD?  We will continue to see this description as we read the rest of 2 Chronicles.  Ask yourself how history would record your life?  Are you satisfied with that description?

As we read about Rehoboam, today, we read that he had not set his heart on seeking the LORD.  Herein is the foundation to whether your life is pleasing or displeasing to the LORD.  Can you honestly say today that your heart is set on seeking HIM?

Devotional by Steve Horn. Scripture links by www.biblegateway.com. Animated video by www.thebibleproject.com

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April 22, 2 Chronicles 6-9

 

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You have probably heard of 2 Chronicles 7:14.  It is usually offered as a prayer for revival or a prayer for a nation.  Notice, though, that 2 Chronicles is not a prayer, but rather God’s response to the prayer offered by Solomon.  God’s response is a reminder that He will keep His covenant with Israel.  In addition, God’s response is a reminder that He does hear when we pray.

Solomon begins his prayer with praise and humility.  Solomon’s prayer contains the attitude of complete dependence upon God.  Real prayer starts with acknowledging that we are completely dependent upon God.  Until we recognize our total dependence on God to work, all of our praying is rather mechanical and mundane.  Finally, Solomon’s prayer acknowledges the importance of repentance in God hearing our requests.

Solomon’s prayer, like those read in 1 Chronicles, also serves as a model for our praying.  Indeed our families, churches, and nations are in need of prayers that are humble, attitudes that are dependent upon God, and hearts that are repentant of sin.  Then, and only then, will God hear and heal. 

Devotional by Steve Horn. Scripture links by www.biblegateway.com. Animated video by www.thebibleproject.com

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